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Different type of Pencil Shading Techniques – by Gaurav Singhvi

Different type of Pencil Shading Techniques – by Gaurav Singhvi

There are many types for shading and each type will change the style of  your drawing.

 

Pencil sketching has long been a popular art form, and it’s no wonder why. Sketching with a pencil is versatile, portable, and requires only a few basic art supplies. With just a few tools you can create an incredibly detailed and beautiful work of art.  Learning how to create shading will take your art to a higher level. Shading art makes all the difference between an amateur drawing and a piece of art, simply because shadows add depth to your subject. Shading is the part that makes a drawing go from a flat contour drawing to a 3 dimensional illusion.

There are many styles in which you can sketch with a pencil, all ranging from simplistic lines to complex drawings and sketches. Learning a variety of different sketching techniques can take your pencil drawings to a whole new level, bringing greater depth and refinement to the artwork you create. Here, we share a variety of pencil sketching techniques to try in your next creation. Read on to discover our top sketching tips and techniques.

  1. Cross Hatching: Cross hatching is where you overlap lines at various angles. It’s great for drawing fabrics like burlap, textured (wrinkly) skin and whatever else you can think of that displays such a pattern. To shade light areas, lighten your lines and space them further apart. In shadowed areas, darken them and bring them closer together. I like to start by the lightest area and then add layers of cross hatching until I reach the darkest area of the drawing.

     

       2. Hatching (with parallel lines):Hatching with parallel lines is the same as cross hatching, except you are making all the lines go in               the same direction. It is a bit more time consuming than cross hatching but can lead to interesting results.

       

 

       3. Contour Shading: Contour shading is similar to hatching and cross hatching. The difference is that   the lines are curved to follow the contours of the subject. So these lines can be drawn horizontally, vertically and even diagonally.

       

 

       4. Scribbling: doodle is a drawing made while a person’s attention is otherwise occupied. Doodles are simple drawings that can have concrete        representational meaning or may just be composed of random and abstract lines, generally without ever lifting the drawing device from the paper, in which case it is usually called a “scribble”.

Scribbling or scumbling is a fun way to shade a drawing and it goes fast! Scumbling or scribble drawings shading works particularly well for portraits and still life.

        

        5. Stippling: Stippling is the creation of a pattern simulating varying degrees of solidity or shading by using small dots. Such a pattern may occur in nature and these effects are frequently emulated by artists. we can also say that Stippling is the art of adding dots to add shading and depth, similar to hatching or cross hatching. The closer the dots, the deeper the effect. To ensure that your dots show up and make a better impact, it’s best to use a softer graphite for this effect, as it comes out darker.

       

 

      6. Circling: As the name suggests, circling consists of many overlapping circles. The more circles you draw, the more smooth the            texture  becomes! You can use it to draw fuzzy fabrics, soft cottony fabrics, realistic skin textures and more. Control the tone your pencil produces by simply adjusting the amount of pressure you place on it. To create smooth transitions, you can make small circular strokes that give you a more blended appearance. It’s important to note that you shouldn’t make small circles with perceptible lines. Instead, move the pencil around in a circular motion when adding pressure. For this approach a duller pencil works best. To add a cleaner shading element to your drawing, you can try smooth shading. This can be done in a number of ways, including using your finger or a rolled-up piece of paper to blend in hatching or cross hatching This will give your sketch a smoother appearance. You can also blend simply by angling your pencil to utilize the wider edge, creating thicker lines that create the appearance of shadows and shading.

           

     7. Smooth Shading & Blending:

To add a cleaner shading element to your drawing, you can try smooth shading. This can be done in a number of ways, including using            your finger or a rolled-up piece of paper to blend in hatching or cross hatching This will give your sketch a smoother appearance. You               can also blend simply by angling your pencil to utilize the wider edge, creating thicker lines that create the appearance of shadows and               shading.

 

 

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